Nourish your Skin by What you Put on your Holiday Plate

Happy Holiday PlateWe have made our way back to the holiday season, and that means more opportunities to connect with friends and loved ones. It means opportunities to jump in the leaves, or to build a snowman. The holidays also tend to bring on a healthy dose of busyness. We have shopping and wrapping and cooking and more shopping to do. In the midst of all this, we may also find ourselves headed to numerous holiday gatherings. All of this hoopla can have unexpected effects on your skin. Here, we will dive into what you can feel good about eating this season, and what you may want to avoid.

The Happy Holiday Plate
There are certain winter foods, and certain goodies that we tend to enjoy more frequently around the holidays. Those that feed the skin – as well as our senses – include:

  • Coffee. The positive effects that coffee can have on the skin and the body in general can make you positively certain you will never again try to give up your favorite beverage. Specifically, some of the compounds in coffee beans that make it into your cup can offer substantial protection against nonmelanoma skin cancer.
  • Pumpkin. Bring on the pumpkin pie! This tasty treat is on most holiday tables, and now you can feel even better about that little extra slice. Pumpkin is filled with nourishing vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, which fights free radical that degrade the skin. There are also carotinoids in pumpkin that help you ward off damage from UV exposure.

Foods that Rob your Skin of Goodness
Yes, part of the reason that we indulge in holiday treats is because there is a certain type of comfort that we get from seasonal goodies. However, we also eat to feed the body with nourishing ingredients. Some of the holiday fare that could be detrimental to skin health include:

  • Fast food and processed foods. Most of the things we grab on the go are loaded with sodium. Too much salt can cause your face to look puffy.
  • Sugar. This is a hard one to avoid completely, but care should be taken to minimize sugar consumption through the holiday season and beyond. This is because sugar has been found to degrade collagen, which we need to avoid premature aging.

We extend well wishes to all of our patients for a healthy holiday season.